Saturday, 28 September 2013

Norfolk moths: Rockland St. Peter garden, 27 September 2013

The night of 27 September began almost cloudless and cool with no moon. By the pre-dawn, skies were completely clear and a quarter-moon (with Jupiter alongside) illuminated the trap. Pre-dawn temperatures were 6.7°C at 06h00 and 6.5°C at 06h15. Golden Plover flocks were once again heard moving overhead in the pre-dawn.

New species were Blair's Shoulder-knot, Orange Sallow and Large Wainscot - all of them perched on surfaces outside the trap itself.

Black Rustics continue to make up a quarter of the catch.

Blair's Shoulder-knot Lithophane leautieri
Orange Sallow Xanthia citrago
Large Wainscot Rhizedra lutosa


Macro-moths (79 moths of 16 spp.); no micros:-

Larentia clavaria Mallow 1
Chloroclysta truncata Common Marbled Carpet 4
Noctua pronuba Large Yellow Underwing 6
Noctua comes Lesser Yellow Underwing 2
Noctua fimbriata Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing 1
Aporophyla nigra Black Rustic 18
Lithophane leautieri Blair's Shoulder-knot 2
Agrochola litura Brown-spot Pinion 8
Agrochola lychnidis Beaded Chestnut 21
Omphaloscelis lunosa Lunar Underwing 7
Xanthia citrago Orange Sallow 1
Xanthia togata Pink-barred Sallow 1
Xanthia icteritia Sallow 3
Rhizedra lutosa Large Wainscot 1
Paradrina clavipalpis Pale Mottled Willow 1
Hypena proboscidalis Snout 2

Friday, 27 September 2013

Book review: Britain's Day-flying Moths by David Newland, Robert Still, & Andy Swash

Britain's Day-flying Moths: A Field Guide to the Day-flying Moths of Britain and Ireland

David Newland, Robert Still, & Andy Swash
Technical Advice by Mark Parsons
Princeton University Press WILDGuides | 2013
224 pp. | 15 x 21 cm | 200+ colour photos. 155 colour distribution maps
Paperback  | £17.95 / $29.95 | ISBN: 9780691158327

Roughly 60 species of butterfly and about the same number of dragonflies are found in the UK. These two groups of insects have become popular targets for study by amateur naturalists in recent years - not least by birders, lured by anything that can regarded as an honorary bird. While out studying these groups, the observer is bound to come across day-flying moths - if only a Six-spot Burnet or Silver-Y - and with perseverance many more species will be encountered. Indeed, Butterfly Conservation's ever more popular annual Big Butterfly Count asks observers to record day-flying moths as well as butterflies. Since there are only about twice as many day-flying moths as butterflies, they are a logical progression for the birder-turned-entomologist.

Butterflies and dragonflies are well-served by field guides, including companion guides Britain's Butterflies and Britain's Dragonflies in the same series, and with the appearance of the magnificent Britain's Hoverflies earlier this year, WILDGuides have most of the easily-identifiable diurnal insects covered. Up until now identifying day-flying moths has required the use of detailed field guides like  the Field Guide to the Moths of Great Britain and Ireland and its companion Field Guide to the Micro-Moths of Great Britain and Ireland - and finding the relatively small number of day-flying moths amongst the 900 species of macro-moth or 1,000+ species of micro-moth in these books might be a challenge. Given the numbers, they could be easily covered by a smaller field guide. Enter Britain's Day-Flying Moths...

There is no hard-and-fast definition of a day-flying moth. All moths can fly by day, but some of them do it more frequently than others, or or more easily disturbed from their resting places, while a number of species are clearly diurnal. In all, some 133 species of macro-moth are generally considered to be day-flyers, with an additional 22 micro-moths adding to the list. All of them are covered by this guide. The format of the book follows previous WILDGuides publications. All relevant information is to be found on a single page, images are all high-quality photographs and supporting data is accurate and concise. A line on the top-left hand corner of each page indicates the true length of the forewing. The maps are a useful feature - sufficiently large to allow resolution of distributions at local scales. As with other WILDGuides, there is attention to conservation status: species that are Nationally Rare, Nationally Scarce, UK BAP species and those that appear in the British Red Data Book are clearly indicated. An annotated checklist at the end of the book provides tabulated information on ecology and conservation status.

As with other WILDGuides publications, profits finance an appropriate conservation organisation: in this case Butterfly Conservation.

Another great addition to the field naturalist's arsenal. Highly recommended!

References

Ball, S. & Morris, R. (2013) Britain's hoverflies: an introduction to the hoverflies of Britain. WILDGuides / Princeton University Press: Princeton NJ. 296 pp.

Newland, D. & Still, R. (2010) Britain's butterflies: a field guide to the butterflies of Britain and Ireland (2nd edition). WILDGuides / Princeton University Press: Princeton NJ. 224 pp.

Smallshire, D. & Swash, A. (2010) Britain's dragonflies: a field guide to the damselflies and dragonflies of Britain and Ireland (2nd edition). WILDGuides / Princeton University Press: Princeton NJ. 208 pp.

Sterling, P., Parsons, M. & Lewington, R. (2012) Field guide to the micro-moths of Great Britain and Ireland. British Wildlife Publishing: Gillingham, Dorset. 416 pp.

Waring, P., Townsend, M. & Lewington, R. (2009) Field guide to the moths of Great Britain and Ireland (2nd edition). British Wildlife Publishing: Gillingham, Dorset. 444 pp.

Thursday, 26 September 2013

Tortoise beetle

The Chrsomelidae is a family of 35,000 species, often known as leaf beetles. It includes some brightly coloured, spotted or striped members, while the tropical species I am more familiar with can be conspicuously large and metallic green, blue or gold. The Cassidinae or tortoise beetles are easily recognised by their profile: this is clearly the group that inspired the Volkswagen Beetle. In South America, tortoise beetles are sometimes common and, being rather conspicuous, are frequently remarked upon by the visitor. They may show so much of a rim that they look like WWII British infantry helmets, or else be curiously humped or pock-marked.

I was reminded this afternoon that we have several species of tortoise beetle in the UK. Admittedly, at 6 mm long and mostly green, they may not be as striking as their South American counterparts - but they are recognisably built on the same pattern. Here is one that the kids brought in.




I had got as far as the genus Cassida before I stumbled upon Dave Hubble, organiser of the British Leaf and Seed Beetle Recording Scheme. He kindly looked at the photographs and asked for a shot of the underside - so now I know what I need next time! Still, I did enjoy perusing a fellow ecologist's wonderfully eclectic blog.


References

Hogue, C. L. (1993) Latin American Insects and Entomology. University of California Press, Berkeley. 536 pp.

Hubble, D. (2012) Keys to the Adults of Seed and Leaf Beetles of Britain and Ireland. FSC, Telford, UK. 136 pp.

Norfolk moths: Rockland St. Peter garden, 25 September 2013

The night of 25 September began warm (c. 18°C) with overcast skies, but by 05h00 it was almost cloudless and calm with a bright half-moon. At some time during the night a light rain had fallen and wetted the groundsheet and trap area. The temperature at 06h30 was a slightly cooler 8.1°C. As for previous nights, Golden Plover called as flocks passed overhead in the pre-dawn.

There were fewer moths outside the trap, but a couple of Dusky Thorns and a Canary-shouldered Thorn were conspicuous. Compared with previous nights, the trap seemed to be full of moths, all competing for space to hunker down amongst the egg-cartons. Most of these were Brown-spot Pinions and Beaded Chestnuts, tying with 26 apiece. I checked the hindwing of all the latter to exclude Lunar Underwing - and vice versa. Black Rustic numbers were down on the previous catch, but still pretty respectable at 17. New for the trap were a rather anaemic Angle Shades and a Mallow. Our garden has plenty of hollyhocks and mallows, which may have been the foodplant of the latter.

A fairly washed-out Angle Shades Phlogophora meticulosa.
Mallow Larentia clavaria.


Macro-moths (130 moths of 25 spp.):-

Idaea seriata Small Dusty Wave 2
Xanthorhoe fluctuata Garden Carpet 1
Larentia clavaria Mallow 1
Chloroclysta truncata Common Marbled Carpet 6
Opisthograptis luteolata Brimstone Moth 2
Ennomos alniaria Canary-shouldered Thorn 1
Ennomos fuscantaria Dusky Thorn 2
Campaea margaritata Light Emerald 2
Agrotis segetum Turnip Moth 1
Ochropleura plecta Flame Shoulder 1
Noctua pronuba Large Yellow Underwing 5
Noctua comes Lesser Yellow Underwing 1
Xestia c-nigrum Setaceous Hebrew Character 3
Aporophyla nigra Black Rustic 17
Dryobotodes eremita Brindled Green 2
Agrochola litura Brown-spot Pinion 26
Agrochola lychnidis Beaded Chestnut 26
Omphaloscelis lunosa Lunar Underwing 8
Xanthia togata Pink-barred Sallow 3
Xanthia icteritia Sallow 7
Phlogophora meticulosa Angle Shades 1
Hydraecia micacea Rosy Rustic 2
Gortyna flavago Frosted Orange 3
Rivula sericealis Straw Dot 1
Hypena proboscidalis Snout 6

Relax UK national parks legislation, advocates Defra Secretary Owen Paterson

Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Owen Paterson's speech at the Conference of the Association of National Park Authorities was published today. I heard him discussing his views on BBC Radio 4's Farming Today. Using a perversion of the concept of biodiversity offsetting (since, by definition, national parks already are already offsetting  development elsewhere) Paterson advocates relaxing the UK's already weak protected area legislation to allow for the expansion of unspecified infrastructure.

We are working to reduce the unnecessary burdens that hold back rural business, not least our farmers. I see my role as getting out of people’s hair.
This is why I am particularly interested in Biodiversity Offsetting.
Offsetting gives us a chance to improve the way our planning system works. It gets round the long-running conundrum of how to grow the economy at the same time as improving the environment. It could provide real opportunities in our National Parks, where the necessary extension of a farm building could result in the enhancement of an existing habitat or the creation of a new one.
Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/owen-paterson-speech-to-national-parks-conference

Paterson is not known for his knowledge of environmental matters and publicly struggles with even the most basic concepts. It is not clear whether (as in his previous failure to grasp the evidence related to badger-culling, effects of neonicotinoids and climate change) he simply does not understand what national parks are or what biodiversity offsetting means, or whether (as with his rather more sinister role in raptor persecution or privatisation of the Forestry Commission) he is deliberately sabotaging the resources he is entrusted to protect. Merely incompetent or willfully negligent? In either case it is clear that he should now be removed from his post.

Tuesday, 24 September 2013

Norfolk moths: Rockland St. Peter garden, 23 September 2013

The night of 23 September was almost cloudless and calm with a bright half-moon. The temperature at 05h30 was a mild 11.6°C. By that time a light, misty dew was beginning to fall on the trap. The trap and adjacent walls and sheet were spotted with Black Rustics - two dozen in all. A selection of forms of Common Marbled Carpet required a close inspection to discount Dark Marbled Carpet. The only new species was a very battered Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing. As with previous nights, the pre-dawn was full of the trills and plaintive whistles of Golden Plover, as flocks passed overhead. Tawny Owls, Little Owls and a foraging Hedgehog added to the soundscape.

Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing Noctua fimbriata in resting position
Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing Noctua fimbriata from South (1st ed., 1907)
Large Yellow Underwing Noctua pronuba   
Lunar Underwing Omphaloscelis lunosa, Black Rustic Aporophyla nigra & Large Yellow Underwing Noctua pronuba   


Macro-moths (83 moths of 17 spp.):-

Chloroclysta truncata Common Marbled Carpet 7
Noctua pronuba Large Yellow Underwing 6
Noctua comes Lesser Yellow Underwing 7
Noctua fimbriata Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing 1
Xestia c-nigrum Setaceous Hebrew Character 3
Mythimna pallens Common Wainscot 2
Aporophyla nigra Black Rustic 24
Agrochola litura Brown-spot Pinion 14
Agrochola lychnidis Beaded Chestnut 3
Omphaloscelis lunosa Lunar Underwing 4
Xanthia togata Pink-barred Sallow 1
Amphipyra pyramidea Copper Underwing 1
Hydraecia micacea Rosy Rustic 4
Nonagria typhae Bulrush Wainscot 1
Diachrysia chrysitis Burnished Brass 1
Rivula sericealis Straw Dot 1
Hypena proboscidalis Snout 3

Sunday, 22 September 2013

Norfolk moths: Rockland St. Peter garden, 21 September 2013

With the prospect of another mild night, I could not resist putting out the trap again. Andy Swash and I had been discussing the impact of trapping on moth populations and the numbers of retrapped individuals when traps are set on consecutive nights. After some mark-recapture experiments, Andy believes the retrap rate to be extremely low - perhaps 1% - even when moths are released alongsid the trap. Certainly, my last two consecutive nights were very different with little indication of moths being trapped on both nights.

The night began almost cloudless with quite a bright moon. By dawn it was completely overcast and there had been a light rain. It was also warm, with a balmy dawn temperature of 13.7°C. The first moth I happened upon as I went out of the door at 04h45 was a lovely fresh-looking Pink-barred Sallow resting in the doorway of the lean-to: a bright jewel of a moth against this black background. A few feet away, on the adjacent wall, was a large geometrid, which turned out to be a male Pale Oak Beauty. Waring & Townsend mention a probable "partial second generation in southern England, September-October", but there seem to be no recent Norfolk records from these months. Both species were now for the trap.

 Pale Oak Beauty Hypomecis punctinalis  

Pink-barred Sallow Xanthia togata   



Macro-moths (20 spp.):-

Idaea seriata Small Dusty Wave 1
Chloroclysta truncata Common Marbled Carpet 2
Thera obeliscata Grey Pine Carpet 1
Opisthograptis luteolata Brimstone Moth 1
Ennomos alniaria Canary-shouldered Thorn 1
Peribatodes rhomboidaria Willow Beauty 1
Hypomecis punctinalis Pale Oak Beauty 1
Campaea margaritata Light Emerald 1
Noctua pronuba Large Yellow Underwing 7
Noctua comes Lesser Yellow Underwing 3
Aporophyla nigra Black Rustic 1
Agrochola litura Brown-spot Pinion 1
Omphaloscelis lunosa Lunar Underwing 1
Xanthia togata Pink-barred Sallow 1
Amphipyra pyramidea Copper Underwing 2
Gortyna flavago Frosted Orange 1
Paradrina clavipalpis Pale Mottled Willow 1
Diachrysia chrysitis Burnished Brass 1
Rivula sericealis Straw Dot 1
Hypena proboscidalis Snout 4

Saturday, 21 September 2013

Norfolk moths: Rockland St. Peter garden, 20 September 2013

A warm, calm, overcast night with a dawn temperature (presumed minimum) of 11.8°C - much milder than the last few nights. The conditions resulted in a jump in moth diversity, with a total of 23 species of macro-moth recorded. Four new species were Grey Pine Carpet, Black Rustic (arriving in force), a lovely Brindled Green and a couple of Beaded Chestnuts, one of which was tricky to separate from Lunar Underwing. 

I checked the trap early, but some of the moths were still around for Andy Swash to look at. He helped with tips for separating the two Copper Underwings based on palp colour and for distinguishing Beaded Chestnut from Lunar Underwing. He particularly enjoyed the Bulrush Wainscot.

Grey Pine Carpet Thera obeliscata - note weakly indented inner edge of central cross-band.
The aptly-named Black Rustic Aporophyla nigra - one of nine.
Beaded Chestnut Agrochola lychnidis
Brindled Green Dryobotodes eremita - somewhat greener in life.


Moths - macros only (23 spp.):-

Idaea seriata Small Dusty Wave 2
Xanthorhoe fluctuata Garden Carpet 1
Chloroclysta truncata Common Marbled Carpet 5
Thera obeliscata Grey Pine Carpet 1
Colostygia pectinataria Green Carpet 2
Campaea margaritata Light Emerald 1
Agrotis segetum Turnip Moth 2
Noctua pronuba Large Yellow Underwing 6
Noctua comes Lesser Yellow Underwing 3
Xestia xanthographa Square-spot Rustic 1
Mythimna albipuncta White-point 1
Mythimna pallens Common Wainscot 1
Aporophyla nigra Black Rustic 9
Dryobotodes eremita Brindled Green 1
Agrochola litura Brown-spot Pinion 3
Agrochola lychnidis Beaded Chestnut 2
Omphaloscelis lunosa Lunar Underwing 1
Xanthia icteritia Sallow 1
Amphipyra pyramidea Copper Underwing 2
Luperina testacea Flounced Rustic 1
Nonagria typhae Bulrush Wainscot 1
Hoplodrina ambigua Vine's Rustic 1
Hypena proboscidalis Snout 6

Thursday, 19 September 2013

Norfolk moths: Rockland St. Peter garden, 18 September 2013

There was just a light cover of cloud and a light SW breeze on the night of 18 September. With a full moon tonight, there was a lot of light about. At 05h30 the temperature was 7.8°C - not as cold as it might have been.

Nothing new in the trap this morning.

Moths - all macros (10 spp.):-

Idaea seriata Small Dusty Wave 2
Chloroclysta truncata Common Marbled Carpet 1
Agrotis segetum Turnip Moth 1
Noctua pronuba Large Yellow Underwing 1
Noctua comes Lesser Yellow Underwing 5
Xestia c-nigrum Setaceous Hebrew Character 3
Atethmia centrago Centre-barred Sallow 1
Omphaloscelis lunosa Lunar Underwing 1
Hydraecia micacea Rosy Rustic 1
Hypena proboscidalis Snout 7

Sunday, 15 September 2013

Book review: 52 Wildlife Weekends by James Lowen

52 Wildlife Weekends

Bradt Travel Guides | 2013
248 pp. | 13.5 x 21.6 cm | abundant colour photographs & maps
Paperback | £14.99 | ISBN: 978-1-84162-464-8

I have known the author of this book for more than thirty years. We were members of the same school natural history society, the same local birdwatchers' club and both went on to work for some of the same international conservation organisations. I know that he is passionate about his subject and has spent countless hours in the field observing and photographing it. No-one is more qualified to write a guide to enjoying Britain's wildlife.

As expected then, this is the perfect guide for nature-lovers of all kinds looking to make the most of British wildlife in their free time. Where to go? When to visit? What to do? What to look for? Where to stay? This guide provides the answers. It might help a family orient their weekend excursions to take better advantage of nature's sights, or allow a keen naturalist to make the most of a business trip to encounter some of the country's most wanted wild species. Although seasoned naturalists will make full use of it, the book should also nudge a less expert readership – perhaps a typical BBC Springwatch audience – to go out and experience Britain's wildlife in the flesh.

Most of the wildlife spectacles that have come to be uniquely associated with the UK are covered: huge flocks of wintering geese, glorious spring Bluebell woods, ancient Yew trees, Puffin colonies, murmurations of Starlings (the aerial displays at their roosts), dusk gatherings of crows, and opportunities to snorkel with Basking Sharks. The majority of these would be targets for even the keen naturalist: charismatic species such as Fen Raft Spider and Purple Emperor, Cirl Bunting and Pine Marten, amongst many others.

With 52 chapters, there is one for every weekend of the year (although one would have to be pretty dedicated to exhaust all the suggestions in one, or even two years). Five wildlife targets grouped within easy striking distance have been chosen for each weekend. For example, a weekend on the Yorkshire coast (#38: September weekend 3) comprises a boat trip from Bridlington, rockpooling at South Landing, and birding at Flamborough, the Outer Head and North Landing. The very first suggested weekend trip of the year is one of my favourites: an excursion to see Islay's wintering geese, and perhaps follow that with the Lagavulin and Laphroaig chasers recommended by the author. The experience is rounded off with Otters and Golden Eagle and, with a bit of luck, White-tailed Eagle. Thirty years on, this remains one of my most memorable short trips: in fact, I still remember the geese and raptors, not to mention Bruichladdich, Bowmore, Lagavulin and Caol Ila.

For each location, a weekend 'base' is suggested: a local town or a particularly characterful lodgings. Contact details and / or OS grid references of lodgings and wildlife sites are provided. There is a good spread of sites, with the majority of them outside south-east England. An index of sites and species, together with a couple of helpful tables, allow the reader to plan a whole year of rewarding wildlife excursions.

A book to inspire, but above all a guide to be taken out and used. This is recommended for anyone who wants to take a more active approach to experiencing the full gamut of Britain's wildlife, whether the keen naturalist with a wildlife hit list or simply those who want to become better acquainted with British nature. My copy has already found a home in the glove compartment...

Norfolk moths: Rockland St. Peter garden, 14 September 2013

The night of 14 September was crystal clear, cloudless, dead calm and fine. As a consequence, temperatures dropped markedly overnight: from the low teens at dusk to 7.8°C when I first checked the trap at 05h30,  4.2°C when I turned it off at 06h10 and 3.9°C by 06h30.

Not surprisingly, the catch was much reduced and for the first time there were neither micros, nor wasps nor carrion beetles. Golden Plover were calling high overhead as I patrolled the trap in the pre-dawn.

Lunar Underwing was new for the trap, with two strkingly different colour forms.

Lunar Underwing Omphaloscelis lunosa: variations on a theme.

Common Marbled Carpet Chloroclysta truncata: this strking colour form is the only one trapped so far.   


Sallow Xanthia icteritia: f. flavescens below  



Moths - all macros (9 spp.):-

Xanthorhoe fluctuata Garden Carpet 1
Chloroclysta truncata Common Marbled Carpet 1
Colostygia pectinataria Green Carpet 1
Noctua pronuba Large Yellow Underwing 2
Noctua comes Lesser Yellow Underwing 1
Agrochola litura Brown-spot Pinion 1
Omphaloscelis lunosa Lunar Underwing 2
Xanthia icteritia Sallow 3
Autographa gamma Silver Y 1

Saturday, 14 September 2013

Rockland St. Peter: more Golden Plover flying south

Another flock of c. 250 Golden Plover flew SW, just after midday. Whistled imitations caused the birds to swirl around high overhead for a minute or two, before they headed southward once again.







Thursday, 12 September 2013

Norfolk moths: Rockland St. Peter garden, 11 September 2013

Last night, 11 September, was forecast to be the only fine night for the next few days, so I decided to give the trap an airing. Between my setting it up at dusk (19h45) and my check on activity at 21h00, a light drizzle had wet the white groundsheet and peppered the perspex. But that was probably the only rain of a night which was cool (though a degree or two warmer than preceeding nights), darkly overcast and dead calm. The temperature on checking the trap at 05h15 was 12.5°C.

The catch was up on the previous one. I finally caught my first Nutmeg, and the other new one for the trap was the common Antler Moth.

The first Nutmeg Discestra trifolii.

Canary-shouldered Thorns always brighten up a dull morning - and they're good with people too...






The full macro list (21 spp.):-

Idaea seriata Small Dusty Wave 2
Xanthorhoe fluctuata Garden Carpet 1
Chloroclysta truncata Common Marbled Carpet 1
Colostygia pectinataria Green Carpet 1
Opisthograptis luteolata Brimstone Moth 1
Ennomos alniaria Canary-shouldered Thorn 3
Agrotis segetum Turnip Moth 2
Noctua pronuba Large Yellow Underwing 5
Noctua comes Lesser Yellow Underwing 1
Xestia c-nigrum Setaceous Hebrew Character 11
Xestia xanthographa Square-spot Rustic 1
Discestra trifolii Nutmeg 1
Cerapteryx graminis Antler Moth 1
Mythimna albipuncta White-point 1
Mythimna pallens Common Wainscot 2
Agrochola litura Brown-spot Pinion 3
Amphipyra pyramidea Copper Underwing 4
Gortyna flavago Frosted Orange 1
Autographa gamma Silver Y 1
Rivula sericealis Straw Dot 1
Hypena proboscidalis Snout 2

Thursday, 5 September 2013

Norfolk moths: Rockland St. Peter garden, 4 September 2013

The night of 4 September was fine and cloudless, yet warm (a min. of perhaps 16°C?), with a very light breeze that had dropped off by the pre-dawn.

Of the four nights I have run the new trap so far, this was the most diverse, with some 35 species of macro moth. A nice big Bulrush Wainscot was the first out, but this was the night of the carpets, with six species, including a lovely fresh Green Carpet, two ginger-coloured Common Marbled Carpets and a neat Purple Bar.


Bulrush Wainscot Nonagria typhae, one of the largest wainscots.

One of six carpet species, Purple Bar Cosmorhoe ocellata.

Macros (35 spp.):-

Timandra comae Blood-vein 1
Idaea seriata Small Dusty Wave 1
Xanthorhoe spadicearia Red Twin-spot Carpet 1
Xanthorhoe fluctuata Garden Carpet 2
Epirrhoe alternata Common Carpet 1
Cosmorhoe ocellata Purple Bar 1
Chloroclysta truncata Common Marbled Carpet 2
Colostygia pectinataria Green Carpet 1
Opisthograptis luteolata Brimstone Moth 13
Ennomos alniaria Canary-shouldered Thorn 3
Ennomos fuscantaria Dusky Thorn 3
Peribatodes rhomboidaria Willow Beauty 2
Campaea margaritata Light Emerald 7
Agrotis segetum Turnip Moth 2
Ochropleura plecta Flame Shoulder 4
Noctua pronuba Large Yellow Underwing 6
Noctua comes Lesser Yellow Underwing 5
Noctua janthe Lesser Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing 5
Diarsia rubi Small Square-spot 4
Xestia c-nigrum Setaceous Hebrew Character 16
Xestia xanthographa Square-spot Rustic 4
Lacanobia oleracea Bright-line Brown-eye 1
Mythimna pallens Common Wainscot 2
Agrochola litura Brown-spot Pinion 1
Atethmia centrago Centre-barred Sallow 4
Xanthia icteritia Sallow 1
Luperina testacea Flounced Rustic 2
Hydraecia micacea Rosy Rustic 8
Gortyna flavago Frosted Orange 2
Nonagria typhae Bulrush Wainscot 1
Hoplodrina ambigua Vine's Rustic 3
Diachrysia chrysitis Burnished Brass 3
Abrostola tripartita Spectacle 1
Rivula sericealis Straw Dot 1
Hypena proboscidalis Snout 7